A day in the life..

Camping, sunrise, prepping.

This is the sunrise I woke to today.  I had was prepping for a little Bob Ross action today, but that didn’t materialize.  With temperatures in the sixties during breakfast, it would have been a great morning for camping.  I had my hopes high, but a cold front moved in bringing clouds and strong winds.  Met with a gent to sell a lathe I’ve sitting around and darn near froze.  Ah, coverall weather once again! Pics are clickable.

Sunrise 10-21-17
Sunrise 10-21-17

Our ’88 Camry has been a pain in the ear ever since the muffler let go about a month ago.   I picked up a $2 replacement a couple of weeks ago at an auction in Springview Nebraska where we roomed it, no camping (and no sunrise – too cloudy), but froze the next day none the less.  Below is a shot of me preparing the old pipe I pulled off our 1952 MeadowBrook.  It’s rusty and ugly, but turned out to be the same diameter as the stock pipe on our Toyota.

Cutting Camry Pipe
Cutting Camry Pipe

Here’s a shot of the grinder getting ready to clean off the rust.  If you’ve ever welded, you know the inherent difficulties when rust is involved.  I clean each pipe section back to be sure the rust will not interfere with the weld.  Any impurities camping out in the weld area will create porosity, not only weakening the joint but leading to exhaust leaks as well.

Grinding off the rust
Grinding off the rust

This is the final product before installation.  A select combination of bends and pipe allow this muffler to be installed and piped to the exhaust still camped under the car.  I used a 110V Hobart flux core machine to work this “magic”.  Once installed, the car was quiet once again.  I will need to learn how to include videos in these posts soon!

Camry Muffler

Finally, I traded an old TO20 I had sitting in the driveway for this 1973 Ford F250 Camper Special.  It is “equipped” with the 390 V8, power steering, power brakes, manual transmission, and 3.54 gears.  Runs decent, needs a little work, but will make someone a fun little pickup.

1973 F250 Camper Special
1973 F250 Camper Special

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Blue sky, survival books, and other transmissions.

Yesterday (10-17-17) was a beautiful day to sit outside and enjoy lunch. 75 degrees, no wind, just sun and clear blue skies.  It’s rare we get blue skies here so I am glad I got to enjoy it.  Of course the picture doesn’t do it justice, but close your eyes and picture a full blue sky…out of your shop door of course, as this is where the photo was taken.  Fall is surely here, I’ve included a link about prepping for fall at Permies and heating your house with Rocket Mass Heater technology.

Such a blue sky, well in person at least!
Such a blue sky, well in person at least!

I heard about this book from John Pugliano, where I cannot remember.  It’s an excellent how to manual, well at least the first 25 pages are.  Bradford Angier did not waste any time getting the reader into the nitty gritty of survivial.  He begins the book with basic shelter, which seem pretty in depth in my opinion.  Search for your favorite book on the link in the photo below.

My new reading material.
My new reading material.

Just in case any of my students view this page I cannot let you know what kind of transmission this is.  I pulled it out of my 1959 Dodge W100 last night.  The students will be performing a complete rebuild for the transmission section of the course.  Stay tuned…

1959 Dodge W100 Transmission...What is it?
1959 Dodge W100 Transmission…What is it?

Here’s the muffler off our 1988 Toyota Camry.  I was going to lay it next to the $2 replacement I got on an auction, but it fell apart as you can see.  I plan on installing Thursday as I need to scrounge some extra exhaust pipe bends to weld in.

Camry Muffler
Camry Muffler

So this is what Marly has me driving over every morning.  She crushed them, just didn’t pick them up.  I guess I could, but… Maybe the bike tires will add a little extra flattening.

Crushed Aluminum cans
Crushed Aluminum cans

Swaps Abound! 10-16-17

Sunday was a beautiful day here in Ord.  We decided to take some time and “Bob Ross” it as we like to say.  Marly painted the lower left and touched up the painting in the upper right.  I spent my time on the painting in the right side of the photo plus used up my leftover paint on a painted steel panel sitting outside.  Marly seems to be falling under the Impressionist umbrella whereas I seem to be leaning towards realist landscape.  Her style has piqued my interest but I will leave her to her devices…

Oil Paintings 10-15-17
Oil Paintings 10-15-17

While I’m on the subject of paintings, I swapped some cash for this landscape I found at Goodwill in Grand Island on Saturday.  It is signed Verna Buller, 1984.  I searched Ms. Buller and found the obit linked in the photo.  I’m not sure if she is the painter, but I find it interesting none the less.

Verna Buller 1984
Verna Buller 1984

This is the axle I found on Facebook; an 8.8″ out of a 1997 Ford Explorer.  It’s coded D4 which supposedly means 3.73 ratio limited slip.  I didn’t take the time to open it up, I’m just glad I found a decent disk brake axle with the same width AND bolt pattern as is under our 1952 Meadowbrook.  Once the engine is installed, we’ll begin the process of swapping this under it.

1997 Ford Explorer Axle Code D4
1997 Ford Explorer Axle Code D4

We also swapped our long time grocery store for a new one located in Loup City.  This came quite unexpectedly as we were quite happy with Speed’s Apple Market in Ord.  Marly drove out to pick up a few groceries and saw the sign below.  Needless to say, free speech is alive and well.  As informed citizens of this great land, we are voting with our dollars by taking them elsewhere.  I understand how easy it is for folks here in the midwest to hate, we just chose not to be a part of it.

Freedom of Speech - BLM?
Freedom of Speech – BLM?

Storing the Harvest 10-11-17

We had a hard freeze Tuesday night so we picked as much Wednesday evening as we could with the daylight remaining.  Marly took care of the peppers and prepared them for dehydration.  I picked the gourds and few remaining tomatoes.  The dehydrator filled our house with unmistakable pepper goodness.

Marly Prepping Peppers
Marly Prepping Peppers

This is a sampling of the gourds picked from the back yard.  The best, most colorful examples grew upon the log splitter.  Go figure.  Also picked were a handful of albino gourds, interesting as the next gourd down the vine was colored as below.  We’re selling them locally for 25 cents each or five for a buck.

Home grown gourds.
Home grown gourds.

Here’s the full harvest of gourds, bot too bad for a volunteer plant in the compost.  We weren’t sure what kind of vine it was when we first noticed it, but since it sprawled so fast AND prevented us from mowing a difficult hillside section, we decided to let it grow.

Bounty of gourds.
Bounty of gourds.

I noticed this praying mantis from the bathroom window.  Grabbed the camera, ran outside, and took this picture.  That is 4″ exposure cedar siding, pretty decent size creature.

Praying Mantis on Building
Praying Mantis on Building

Important lesson learned Wednesday afternoon: just because the bolt pattern on an ‘80 Toyota pickup and ’49 Plymouth Special Deluxe is 5 on 4.5″ doesn’t mean the wheels will fit.  First, the Plymouth has an alignment stud on the hub to locate the wheel as the wheels are retained by actual lugs instead of lug nuts, requiring a sixth hole to be drilled in the bolt circle.  Second, the center hole in a Toyota wheel of that vintage is about 1/16″ too small to fit either the front or rear hubs of the ’49.  Finally, 14″ wheels don’t clear the steering arm on the front knuckles.  I installed the wheels on the rear, but they will only be used for moving the vehicle around locally.  The pressure of the wheel on the center of the hub is all that holds them on.  I don’t believe the back of the wheel actually sits against the hub at all.

Rear tires on '49 Plymouth
Rear tires on ’49 Plymouth

1949 Plymouth Special Deluxe P18

 

Yesterday’s post told of our exploits (err… frozen stumblings?) at the Kenaston auction North of Springview Nebraska. Among all the relics to be had was this ’49 Plymouth Special Deluxe.  Designated P18 way back when, it was the first real body style change Plymouth made after World War II. I found it handsome enough to enter the winning bid just over iron price which, well let’s just say my wallet didn’t get much lighter.

1949 Plymouth Special Deluxe right after purchase
1949 Plymouth Special Deluxe right after purchase

Among the upgrades for ’49 was the lower hood line and redesigned front clip.  Much sharper and sportier in appearance than the ’48 and earlier models.  The bumpers were often sought after by early rod customizers.

1949 Plymouth Special Deluxe Grill, push guard, & bumper.

The forklift driver was gentle and set her down just ahead of the axles to ensure no trailer sway.  I placed some wooden blocks under the front control arms so I can jack the front easier to install new tires.  These cars sit really low and it become quite a chore to raise them high enough to clear the wheel and tire assembly when the tires are totally flat.

1949 Plymouth Special Deluxe loaded for home.
1949 Plymouth Special Deluxe loaded for home.

Here’s the first shot on the trailer in front of our house.  The three-hour trek proved to be uneventful with the wind at our backs most of the drive.  I attempted putting inflated tires on it last night…no go.  Plymouth put a centering stud on the hubs to allow the wheel installer a free hand when installing lug bolts.  Yep, not nuts here, just bolts.  I had pointed this out to Marly earlier this afternoon but it wasn’t until I had the wheel off did the duh moment occur. Hah!

1949 Plymouth Special Deluxe home
1949 Plymouth Special Deluxe home

There’s the wheel I attempted to change front and center.  The hub cap and beauty ring are two different pieces, so the rusted out center portion will change out easily.  I have some junk wheels here of a Toyota pickup that have the same lug pattern, I may just drill a hole for the aforementioned stud in order to get it onto rolling stock.

Little bit of bodywork to do.
Little bit of bodywork to do.

Overdrive.  Must have been a big thing back then because many of the various makes and models sported this option.  I know it’d sure help out today though I’m not sure it’d be stout enough to handle today’s horsepower and torque.  Linked in the picture is a limited discussion of the overdrive unit.

Overdrive
Overdrive

The decklid emblem is pretty fancy.  From my limited research of this model, the brake light was mounted somewhere back here as the sides tail lights did not function when the brake was applied.

P18 Plymouth Special Deluxe Decklid Emblem
P18 Plymouth Special Deluxe Decklid Emblem

 

Sold! More Junk Home! 10-09-17

We took the day off Monday to attend a Wolf auction in Springview Nebraska, a small town near South Dakota in the rolling pine country.  Clean little community with all the amenities to survive.  We ate at the local watering hole – Cattleman’s Lounge – and stayed at the accompanying Cattleman’s Bunkhouse.  Highly recommend sipping a few suds at the bar, which was shipped to Wewela SD at the turn of the last century (from England) then hauled the 15 miles south in 1940 to its current resting place.  The food is typical bar affair: I recommend the gizzards – yum!

WPA Municple building in Springview NE.
WPA Municple building in Springview NE.

Strolling around town Sunday evening gave us a few photo opps.  I couldn’t resist getting a few shots of this ’53 or ’54 Plymouth sitting across the lot from the Bunkhouse.  It doesn’t look to be in too bad shape.   Come to think of it, there wasn’t much rust in any of the vehicles on the road in the region.  Probably not much salt on the back country trails ’round there.

Homemade Cadillac Pickup
Plymouth in Springview Alley

Auction time began with rain and light wind and 45 degrees.  The clouds had parted by 2 giving decent photo lighting but some annoying hard shadows.  Here are a few of the better shots I obtained, most of them heading out.  This old Chevy was the first to leave, most likely loaded with the forks.

Old Sedan Heading Out.
Old Sedan Heading Out.

This Cadillac was converted to a pickup by someone in need quite a few years back.  I can only imagine that Caddies lost their value as fast back then as they do now.  Kind of painful now to see a 2 door chopped up like this, but for the selling price it probably won’t see the crusher soon.

Homemade Cadillac Pickup
Homemade Cadillac Pickup

I was going to bid this old Galaxy up if the two bidders hadn’t run it to $500 on their own.  Not a bit of rust out in the body, 289, auto.  One of the cleaner examples with only 1 damaged piece of trim on the decklid.

Galaxy going home.
Galaxy going home. $500

This straight eight Chrysler was delicately loaded with the forks, but I was too far away to catch the action.  The radiator is massive in this car!

New Yorker Going Home
New Yorker Going Home

 

New Yorker Going HomeThese Caddies are heading south to one of the parts pullers there.

Going to the boneyard.
Going to the boneyard.